Baltic Sea – behind the scenes 4

While working on my main photographs for “Baltic-Sea – hidden cargo” I rediscovered some “behind-the-scenes” shots from Sweden.

The swedish people seem to like american cars. Visby.img_1445_20160702_klein


I just can´t pass by without taking a picture. IMG_1070_20160625IMG_1069_20160625 IMG_1067_20160625Forsmark.

Baltic Sea – behind the scenes 3

Carrying a field camera for my series “Baltic Sea – hidden cargo” is no fun. Try to reduce the weight by renouncing on lenses or gear you do not really need. I decided to take two lenses with me (150mm, 90mm), a spotmeter, a sekonic lightmeter, a few film holders, front and rear panels, bellow, hardware, films. Don´t forget the massive tripod. So I was able to get even to remote spots quite quickly.



Heading back to the car for about 750m through a swedish forest in the evening is no fun, too. Hungry midges all the way made me run like a pro.

Melitta Professional

Stills from my recent corporate film for Melitta Professional “How we build professional coffee machines”.


BALTIC SEA – behind the scenes 2

June 25, 2016

My tour for “Baltic Sea – hidden cargo” leads through sweden. The lovely country has a long coast. Nuclear power is common in sweden for decades though the majority of the people wanted to leave it since the 1980ies. Nuclear industry knew well how to slow down the exit and has great plans for the nuclear future especially for the final disposal of nuclear waste. Happening so in Forsmark, mid-sweden, where a final nuclear disposal site is planned 500m deep under the surface of two nature reserves called Ängskär and Bondskäret, “famous amongst other things for their genuine, beautiful coastal region and a number of species of orchid such as Adam and Eva.”


BALTIC SEA – behind the scenes 1

June 21, 2016

The first trip for „Baltic Sea – hidden cargo“ takes me to Northern Germany in the Lübecker Bucht and the Kieler and Flensburger Förde.

All the imagery will be influenced from the type of camera I have chosen. I have worked with many different models so far. I try to imagine how the pictures of the Baltic Sea would look. They would be quiet, perhaps sublime and timeless. The camera would be steady like a rock and will never move. It is not only about resolution but it is about the way to the goal. So I decide to take portraits of the sea with a classic analog view camera.


The heavy 4×5“ camera inspires me. The bulky system slows my photography down. My sight is on the subject and I can regard it. Releasing the shutter is a minor matter.

The Sinar P 4×5“ is not famous for being a field camera but I like its versatility and reliability. In the next two years I will visit 30 to 40 places where I will take pictures.

It has been a warm summer day when I was waiting for sunset at the Flensburger Förde in the south of the Little Belt. My camera points to the east where the color of the horizon changes every minute.

It´s 21. June so it is the longest day of this year. After sunset at 10:30 p.m. I stay another 2 hours at the beach and take pictures of the horizon which transformed into kind of a fog. Later it appeared again with a stronger shape.


Flensburger Förde, Little Belt

In 1945 the german Wehrmacht sank about 69.000 Tabun grenades in the south of the Little Belt additionally to 5.000 t bombes and grenades filled with phosgene and tabun. The britsh forces plunged an unknown amount of ammunition in this area in the 1940s after WW2. The 69.000 tabun grenades where lifted in 1959 and 1960 and later sunk again in the Bay of Biscay. Today there are still laying 5.000 t  phosgene and tabun grenades in the Little Belt side by side with the ammunition the british forces dumped.

Musicvideo “SO ODER SO”

This video was written and directed by Daniel and me. I also shot it on the Canon 5D Mark III with Magic Lantern 14bit raw. The workflow with huge raw data is a bit challenging but in the end it provides an impressing quality. Great for grading.

My approach for lighting was to use natural light and practicals as much as possible. When we were preinspecting the private location we noticed that the daylight was coming indirectly through windows and a big skylight which encouraged us sticking to our original plan. My gaffer Simon did a tremendous job by shielding or pushing natural light where it was necessary. The secret weapon for in camera grading was the Digicon 1 Schneider filter, which flattened the contrast even more and gave as a little more latitude. Further it provided a unique, soft look when shooting backlight or straight into the light source.

A tight shedule on the shooting day forced us to decide quickly which was kind of fun.

Furthermore we were incredibly lucky with our tremendous cast, Alicia and Klaus.

In postproduction I applied filmconvert to the footage which gave me a unique look right away. I had this filmlook in mind which I knew so well. My decisions in colorgrading came almost instinctively.

Some filmstills:

sooderso_grading3_sessel sooderso_grading3_klausundalicia sooderso_grading3_klaus3 sooderso_grading3_final_master_denoised_alicia

Albumfilm STROM

We created the Albumfilm for STROM from NULLZWO with a small team and used a Canon 5D Mark III and magic lantern raw. We decided to shoot only in the evening time so the sun was always setting. This allowed us to stretch the shooting over several months trying to keep the continuity in the mood. Another rule was always to use a tripod and barely pan the camera. Our camera operator Sebastian was faithful to these instructions.

The raw footage was converted into PRORES444 C-log and then graded with Apple Color and FilmConvert.

Some stills are here:

albumfilm_strom_3 albumfilm_strom_5 albumfilm_strom_7 albumfilm_strom_8 albumfilm_strom_93 albumfilm_strom_94 albumfilm_strom_95 albumfilm_strom_96